AU dances the night away

The crowd came together as one as the organizers taught them a group dance from on stage. (Photo: Kait Fruechting)
The crowd came together as one as the organizers taught them a group dance from on stage. (Photo: Kait Fruechting)

By Kait Fruechting | Contributor

Dancing is fun and can bring joy to everyone. However, for a cause it is so much more.

Jaguar Miracle and the Augusta University chapter of Alpha Delta Pi brought the Miracle Children of Augusta University into the spotlight at the Miracle Network Dance Marathon on Oct. 28 in the JSAC Ballroom.

Kids, parents and students alike danced for six hours to raise money for the children’s hospital in Augusta. At the top of each hour, the music and dancing stopped, every took a knee, and a miracle child was introduced.

Will McCoy, (left) sophomore student and survivor of childhood cancer, introduced Reese (center) and his mother Ashley Smith (right). Reese was the first of the five Miracle Children to be introduced during AU’s Miracle Network Dance Marathon on Oct. 28 in the JSAC Ballroom. (Photo: Kait Fruechting)
Will McCoy, (left) sophomore student and survivor of childhood cancer, introduced Reese (center) and his mother Ashley Smith (right). Reese was the first of the five Miracle Children to be introduced during AU’s Miracle Network Dance Marathon on Oct. 28 in the JSAC Ballroom. (Photo: Kait Fruechting)

Sophomore student Will McCoy introduced the first child of the evening event. The cause is near and dear to McCoy’s heart as he too is a miracle child having survived Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.

“The most important thing is to help kids realize it is going to get better,” said McCoy.

Reese Smith, 6, took the stage and melted the hearts of the crowd. Everyone could see his happy nature on stage and later as he put his singing skills to the test to serenade the crowd.

His mother Ashley Smith spoke not only of his hospitalizations but also of how he remained happy and social. Reese has overcome six birth defects, has received a kidney transplant and has had over 50 surgeries.

“Hang in there,” is the advice that Smith would give to any parent whose child is sick.

With each hour, children were introduced creating awareness and showing the determination the kids have. The six-hour event raised over $16,000, proving that the first annual Miracle Network Dance Marathon was a success.

While dancing is fun, the cause matters and makes the difference.

“I just love that you are dancing and having fun for those that cannot always get up and dance for themselves,” said Katy Hodges, an event volunteer.

Contact Kait Fruechting at kfruechting@augusta.edu.

Published on November 7, 2016 in Vol. 59, Issue 2 of The Bell Ringer newspaper.

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